More than a simple access card…

 

It is now possible to expand the features of an access or transport card. For example, the Oyster card in London obviously allows access to the Underground, but can also be topped up in a contactless way at ticket machines. Another example would be a university campus, where smartcards can also combine several functionalities, such as various types of payment (photocopying, canteen, laundromat, etc.), contactless access (libraries, parking lots, sports facilities, etc.), connection to the intranet to access their profile and enroll in exams, etc. An airline loyalty card can also become a useful “travel companion”, acting as a boarding card, prepaid card or an access card to VIP lounges or parking lots reserved for the airline’s passengers, etc. Finally, a simple football club membership card can also allow holders’ contactless entry to the stadium, to pay for their hotdog at the interval and to access public transport – all using the same card. On the subject of the partnership between OT and Olympique Lyonnais, Nicolas Raffin, Head of Strategic Marketing & Innovation with OT’s Financial Services Institutions business, explains:

In the future, there will be numerous possibilities, such as making purchases in partner stores around the stadium, wearing an extension to the card in the form of a contactless bracelet or simply incorporating it into a smartphone…

 

More than a simple social security card…

 

An ID card with a government agency or health provider can also take on a new role – as a payment card. In Sri Lanka, for example, OT has teamed up with the bank HNB to issue cards allowing retired people to withdraw their pension, as well as identifying themselves and exercising their rights as citizens. The combination of two functionalities on these new generation cards allows control of amounts paid (social security benefits, welfare payments, etc.) and cardholder authentication.

 

“This improves the service provided to claimants who do not have a bank account or fixed address. In South Africa,” explains Nicolas Raffin, “projects are also underway to allow cardholders to pay by simply reading their fingerprints on a payment terminal. The biometric data will have been pre-recorded on the card. The aim is to encourage the financial inclusion of all, while ensuring a greater level of security since it ensures the holder is who he sayS HE IS.

 

Although it is unlikely there will one day be an “all-in-one card” to replace all the cards in our purses and wallets, it is a safe bet that they will take on new functionalities to make cardholders’ lives that bit easier.